Recipe: Pear & Goat Cheese Galette

It’s Thanksgiving week, babies! My favorite time of year.

More than ever I’m looking forward to a break from work, taking the long drive to see family, and eating a ton of food. And I know that pumpkin and apple pie tend to be the go-tos this time of year, but this Pear and Goat Cheese Galette is 1. damn delicious, 2. way easier than a pie, and 3. so addicting that I ate this entire thing in an afternoon. Plus, I always like something that’s a little different.

Another note, this could easily be served as an appetizer or a dessert. It’s not overly sweet and the goat cheese brings a slightly savory component that’s delicious any time you want to slice it.

Pear & Goat Cheese Galette

Yields 8 slices

  • 1 refrigerated pie crust

  • 2-3 pears, thinly sliced

  • 4 oz goat cheese

  • 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, well chopped

  • 1 teaspoon sugar

  • 1-2 teaspoons honey

  • half a lemon

  • 2 tablespoons butter, cold and cut into small cubes

  • 1 egg, beaten

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick baking mat.

Thinly slice pears and place in a bowl. Squeeze the juice of half a lemon over them, add chopped rosemary, and lightly toss. The lemon juice will keep the pears from browning. Set aside.

Unroll your pie crust on the baking sheet and begin arranging your pear slices in the center, leaving a 1 inch border around the sides. Fold the border over to create the crust and trap in any juices. Sprinkle the top with sugar, and arrange the butter cubes on the top of the galette. Brush the beaten egg on the crust to get a golden brown when baked.

Bake for 20-25 minutes until the pears are just cooked and the crust is golden brown. Let cool slightly and drizzle with honey. Enjoy warm or cold.

Recipe: Pumpkin Bread with Cream Cheese Drizzle

It’s starting to feel really cozy in Philadelphia these days. I can tell because not only is it chilly out, but I’m making and craving soups, drinking bold (+ sometimes funky) wines at night, and spending most of my days underneath our heated blanket wondering how I lived life without a heated blanket. PLUS I’m bringing you back-to-back pumpkin recipes because it’s the best time of year (baking-wise).

Recently I’ve found myself revisiting some of my favorite recipes, making an Apple Crisp the last weekend, as well as my favorite I’m-spending-Friday-night-in cookies: Funfetti Cookies. But I didn’t want my favorite baking season to fly by without another pumpkin recipe. I don’t usually share a recipe that I found someplace else, but this Pumpkin Bread recipe is just too good not to share. You can find it below, or on the Bon Appetit website.

Pumpkin Bread with Cream Cheese Drizzle

Adapted from this recipe

Pumpkin Bread

  • Nonstick vegetable oil spray

  • 2½ cups all-purpose flour

  • 2 tsp. ground cinnamon

  • 2 tsp. kosher salt

  • 1 tsp. baking powder

  • ½ tsp. baking soda

  • ½ tsp. grated nutmeg

  • ⅛ tsp. ground cloves

  • 2 large eggs

  • 1 15-oz. can pumpkin purée

  • 1 Tbsp. plus 1 tsp finely grated ginger (from about one 3" piece fresh ginger)

  • 1½ cups plus 1 Tbsp. sugar

  • 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Cream Cheese Drizzle

  • 4 ounces cream cheese, softened

  • 2 tablespoons butter, softened

  • 1 1/2 cup powdered sugar

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

  • 2-3 tablespoons milk

Make your bread: Preheat oven to 325°. Lightly coat a 9x5" loaf pan with nonstick spray. Line bottom of pan with parchment, leaving a generous overhang on both long sides.

Whisk flour, cinnamon, kosher salt, baking powder, baking soda, nutmeg, and cloves in a medium bowl.

Whisk eggs, pumpkin purée, ginger, and 1½ cups sugar in a large bowl. Stream in oil, whisking constantly until mixture is homogeneous. Gently fold half of dry ingredients into egg mixture until no dry spots remain. Repeat with remaining dry ingredients, stirring to combine but being careful not to overmix.

Transfer batter to prepared pan; smooth top with a spatula. Bake bread, rotating pan once halfway through, until a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, for me, this took more like 90mins to 2 hours to cook thoroughly (even though you can tell from the photos that I could have left it in a few minutes longer…)

Let cool slightly. Using overhang, transfer bread to a wire rack and let cool.

While your bread cools, make your drizzle. In the bowl of an electric mixer, whisk cream cheese and butter until light and fluffy. Add in vanilla. Mix in powdered sugar and 2 tablespoons on milk. Add more milk until glaze is slightly pourable. Once bread has cooled, drizzle the glaze over the cake and serve.

Bread can be kept for several days. Wrap tightly with plastic wrap. A note, I know this bread looks a little undercooked in my photos. In our house, we lean for towards undercooked than overcooked. The cooking time in the recipe leaves room for your perfect doneness.

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Recipe: Pumpkin Monster Cookies

What do you do when you make a batch of D E L I C I O U S L Y pumpkin cookies but they are looking a little boring and lackluster? Throw candy eyes on them and make them Halloween cookies! These cookies are simple to throw together and honestly I can’t stop laughing at how silly they came out. Perfect to throw into a treat bag for your loved ones on Halloween, or for you to eat the entire batch while giving out candy to trick or treaters. I’m not here to judge.

MORE ABOUT THESE COOKIES…These cookies are pillowy pumpkin goodness inside with just the right about of cinnamon and a little extra salt to get the flavors going. Originally, I thought of topping these pumpkin babies with cream cheese buttercream, but after tasting how wonderfully soft they were, I ended up doing an easy, breezy cinnamon drizzle. But try them with a little cream cheese glaze and let me know how it thrills you!

Happy Halloween 🎃

Pumpkin Monster Cookies

Yields 3 dozen

Adapted from this recipe

Pumpkin Cookies

  • 1 cup salted butter, room temperature

  • 1 cup brown sugar

  • 1 large egg, room temperature

  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

  • 1 cup canned pumpkin

  • 2 cups AP flour

  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon

  • 1 teaspoon baking soda

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder

  • 1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts

Cinnamon Drizzle

  • 1 cup powdered sugar (plus more if needed for thickness)

  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

  • 2 tablespoon milk

  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

  • pinch of salt

  • Candy eyes (optional, but recommended)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with a nonstick baking mat.

In a large bowl, cream together butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy (about 5 minutes). Add in vanilla extract and egg. Add in pumpkin and mix well.

In a separate bowl, whisk together flour, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, and baking powder. Add this to the wet ingredients in 3 batches, but careful not to over mix. Fold in walnuts by hand. Place dough in the fridge for 5 minutes to harden slightly.

Drop rounded tablespoons on a baking sheet about 2 inches apart. This is a very soft dough so do not try to roll this into balls in your hand. Place tablespoon-sized dough babies onto the baking sheet and shape slightly with your fingers to make them rounded. Bake for 10-12 minutes or until slightly golden on the bottom. Remove from the oven and let cool on the sheet for 5 minutes before transferring them to cool rack to cool completely.

While your cookies are cooling, whisk together all the ingredients for the cinnamon glaze. Using a spoon, drizzle the glaze over the cookies and stick on candy eyes. Because these are soft cookies, they need to be eaten within a day or two. Make sure they are completely cool before storing them in an airtight container or they will sweat out their moisture.

Hot tip: you need to place the eyes when the glaze is still setting. If you miss that timeframe, mix a little powdered sugar with milk to get a paste and glue each one on.

Fall Bucket List

It's Fall, people.

Pumpkins are everywhere. Mums are on every doorstep. People are talking Halloween costumes. The leaves are changing colors. Scarves are out. I've even broken out both my denim and leather jacket and I'm excited for the change of season. Summer was hot. Like really-hot-all-the-time hot. Like I-need-to-rinse-off-multiple-times-a-day-because-I'm-disgusting hot. So having cool nights and wearing tights and sweaters has been exceptional. Plus, I can turn my oven on again without making my house sweltering. Hooray!

I stopped setting goals on here a long time ago, but I thought it would be fun to create a little "bucket list" of some things I wanted to carve some time out to get done this Fall. Some are Fall-related. Some are just things that need to get done. A couple things I've actually already done between when I wrote this post and actually published it (in bold)! But all in all, I'm looking forward to a change in the seasons.

  1. Get a haircut.
  2. Bake something new with apples.
  3. Figure out a new favorite fall cocktail.
  4. Paint front door.
  5. Host Friendsgiving.
  6. Get extra bedroom in order (paint bed frame, buy bedding, hang art).
  7. Carve pumpkins.
  8. Attend a Rocky Horror Picture Show showing!
  9. DIY a Halloween costume.
  10. Fry something. (I'm secretly terrified of frying things...) 

Anthropologie-Inspired Painted Candle Holders DIY

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A few years ago, I found these beautiful glasses on Anthropologie.com (which are sadly no longer available) and I loved the idea of hand-painting glasses. When I found these 69cent glass candle holders at the thrift store, I knew I could turn them into a perfect additions to my tiny fall decorations.  

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For this little project, you'll need different colors of craft paint (I used orange, light yellow, and black), your glass candle holders, and a paint brush.

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Start by applying the one color of paint in different-sized small dots around the glass candle holders. You'll want to apply them closer together around the bottom of the glass, and more scattered around the top. The overall goal is an ombre effect, but it takes a little bit to really start to see what the end result will look like. Don't give up!

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Begin applying the other colors, following the same strategy as before. You want to focus on filling in the open spaces along the bottom of the glass, and be sporatic about it. It doesn't matter if some of them overlap and try to get different sizes, and going different directions.

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If you notice the colors blending too much, let dry for a few minutes between colors.

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I went around the glass twice with each color, alternating between paint colors. And that's it! Insert a votive or tealight candle and light.

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In love. Perfect easy fall decorations are my favorite.